Jamout! Aniruth’s Synthesizer Dance (Cronbach-Wiggins)

Lee Cronbach – piano, synthesizers Mel Wiggins – congas David Gaines – saxophone Ed Jackson – trombone ? – bass Jun Marc Esteban – tech, uploader and graphic design Photo – Vincente Martinez, Lladró, Thai Dancer in Traditional Clothes, Porcelain,…

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Lee Cronbach – piano, synthesizers
Mel Wiggins – congas
David Gaines – saxophone
Ed Jackson – trombone
? – bass
Jun Marc Esteban – tech, uploader and graphic design
Photo – Vincente Martinez, Lladró, Thai Dancer in Traditional Clothes, Porcelain, 1977
with added flowers

THE MUSIC – For this track I took an acoustic version of Aniruth, with piano, congas, bass, sax and trombone, and then overdubbed lots and lots of synthesizer tracks. Heck, I’d paid for the studio time, so around midnight I said “Let’s have fun – keep those synth grooves coming!” So at 2 AM I made a few decisions as to what to cut and what to keep, always aiming for the thickest and most richly colored sound I could get! and walked out of the studio with a casette copy of the tape. The studio went out of business very soon after, so I never had a better copy of the music than this casette,
which JM uploaded from a CD copy of the casette.
I always had a fondness for this piece (which is why I have two versions on this site). It was the first piece I wrote for a music college that got an F, and the first piece that had continuing popularity with audiences – starting when New Riders of the Purple Sage jammed on it in NYC in the early 1970s at the Fillmore East. I have been playing it ever since. (My other favorite Big Fs from College music pieces are Why Do You Do What You Do? and Morocco, also audience favs).

ANIRUTH – I met Aniruth in 1970-71, when in New York City pro-disco flourished – a mix of hippy, Black, and gay dance cultures mixing in free but patterned wild dance styles combined the seeds of the new R&B, jazz-fusion, and disco dancing, and that became the techno dance styles that by 1980 fused into the urban dance beat the characteristic dance of metropolitan young adults world-wide.
Aniruth was a beautiful young man who by 1971 had decided to make the gender change, ending our relationship. He was also very into rock – his sister had a guitarist lover in Thailand who worshipped Jimi Hendrix, so she burn incense in front of a picture of Hendrix in their Manhattan apartment while we played Janis Joplln’s Me and Bobby McGhee over and over. I wrote this piece for Aniruth, for his dancing, for those romantic mysterious nights in their NYC apartment – and for the wonderful early 70s urban dancing.

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