Global Warming Explained in 1956

A custom compilation of a production first in 1956 televised on American television by the California Academy of Sciences https://archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22California+Academy+of+Sciences%22 Bernard Hubbard explains how glaciers retreat, he mentions how since 1857 glaciers recede worldwide. Hubbard also talks about the ice…

Global Warming Explained in 1956

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A custom compilation of a production first in 1956 televised on American television by the California Academy of Sciences https://archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22California+Academy+of+Sciences%22

Bernard Hubbard explains how glaciers retreat, he mentions how since 1857 glaciers recede worldwide. Hubbard also talks about the ice Albedo effect, and how glaciers can disintegrate.

This program is devoted to glaciers, and also includes a promo for the Academy of Sciences.

SPEAKER

Bernard R.Hubbard, the “Glacier Priest” (Santa Clara University, Department of Geology).

During his expeditions, Father Hubbard snapped thousands of photographs and recorded thousands of feet of motion picture film, some of which appeared in Hollywood newsreels and features. He wrote several books and compiled an Eskimo dictionary http://www.marywood.edu/archives/archival-exhibits/father-bernard-hubbard.html

Described as a riveting lecturer, Hubbard was skilled in the creation of early multimedia presentations using still pictures, films and his own dramatic narration. Hubbard used a writing style similar to that of Jack London, who had done his own part to popularize the Alaskan frontier in the early 20th century. A dramatic retelling of his first visit to Aniakchak by Alaskan author Barrett Willoughby entitled “The Moon Craters of Alaska” in the Saturday Evening Post made his reputation in December 1930. Following the eruption at Aniakchak in May 1931, Hubbard was invited to lecture at the Interior Department in Washington, where National Park Service director Horace M. Albright was considering Aniakchak as a new national monument.[13] Hubbard’s before-and-after images of Aniakchak in 1930 and 1931 — entitled in typical Hubbard prose as “Paradise Found” and “Paradise Lost” — have provided valuable baseline data for estimates of vegetative growth and recovery after volcanic activity. Hubbard compiled the movie footage he shot on his 1930–1932 expeditions into the 1933 film Aniakchak, which was distributed by Fox Studios and played worldwide.[7] Hubbard maintained a grueling lecture schedule. In 1944–45 he gave 93 lectures in 63 days to audiences of up to 7000 people at such venues as Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C., and Carnegie Hall in New York.

RELATED

Twin Glacier, Alaska Retreats from Twin Lake https://blogs.agu.org/fromaglaciersperspective/2015/12/03/twin-glacier-alaska-retreats-twin-lake/

Retreat of glaciers since 1850 (Wikipedia)

Bernard R. Hubbard (Wikipedia)

Hubbard Glacier (Wikipedia)

Alaska’s Silver Millions (1936) https://archive.org/details/alaska-s-silver-millions-1936/alaska-s-silver-millions-1936-10mbps.mp4

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