Decolonizing Somatic Care Practices For The Body in Protest with día bùi and Orlando Zane Hunter Jr.

What protections should adorn a body in resistance? What kinds of care? How have somatic practices of the Black diaspora been colonized? Organized protest calls choreographies into action. An estimated 15,000 New Yorkers gathered on Sunday, June 14th, 2020, for…

Decolonizing Somatic Care Practices For The Body in Protest with día bùi and Orlando Zane Hunter Jr.

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What protections should adorn a body in resistance? What kinds of care? How have somatic practices of the Black diaspora been colonized? Organized protest calls choreographies into action.

An estimated 15,000 New Yorkers gathered on Sunday, June 14th, 2020, for Brooklyn Liberation: An Action for Black Trans Lives, organized by The Okra Project, Marsha P. Johnson Institute, For the Gworls, G.L.I.T.S., and Black Trans Femmes in the Arts. This was a landmark event.

Artist, organizer, and strategist, día bùi, led the emotional first aid response and healing justice component of the June 14 action. In this video she shares safety protocols and practices used during the rally and march. Through a decolonizing lens, choreographer and dance practitioner, Orlando Zane Hunter Jr., offers their perspective on somatic care history and practice to help sustain bodies in protest. Together día and Orlando share personal testimony and information on upcoming work and demonstrations, including, Juneteenth: Black War Dances.

This recorded gathering begins with a 5 minute slideshow directly followed by Angie Pittman who gives a land and an acknowledgement of people enslaved by members of the congregations of the Stuyvesant Chapel and St. Mark’s Church In-The-Bowery.

Opening slideshow design and zoom video editing by Yolanda Royster

Opening slideshow photography by Moses Williams

Main presentation design and slideshow audio by día bùi

Main presentation photography by Cole Witter

Reparations in Black Dance: I Will Repair
A word from día bùi, a non-Black Queer Vietnamese in solidarity and allyship:
“Repair work” has a deep lineage of labor which necessitates vital understanding and acknowledgement. I am utilizing “repair work” in this context as rooted in my collaboration with mayfield brooks and their work with Improvising While Black. Please read mayfield’s Viewing Hours zine as source and navigation through the lineage of this work. The “I Will Repair” statement derives from my work over a decade ago at the Peace Village in Hanoi, Vietnam where children and families affected by and living with Agent Orange. They, too, have never received reparations from the U.S.

More info & resources: http://danspaceproject.org/calendar/decolonizing-som…c-care-practices/

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