Acrobats Ride Topside-Down Zip-Upper 1937 Chevrolet Leader News Newsreel Vol. 3 No. 3

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net/ ‘AERIAL CLOWNS SPEED ALONG HIGHWAY… Superimposed newspaper headline indicating “Topside-Down Zip-Upper Makes Fun for Acrobats.”… VS automobile with acrobatic equipment (revolving ladder) attached to frame. Camera follows moving car as acrobats…

Acrobats Ride Topside-Down Zip-Upper 1937 Chevrolet Leader News Newsreel Vol. 3 No. 3

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Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney

more at http://quickfound.net/

‘AERIAL CLOWNS SPEED ALONG HIGHWAY…

Superimposed newspaper headline indicating “Topside-Down Zip-Upper Makes Fun for Acrobats.”…

VS automobile with acrobatic equipment (revolving ladder) attached to frame. Camera follows moving car as acrobats spin. CU car tires driving over rocky terrain. CU spinning acrobats…’

Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acrobatics
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Acrobatics (from Ancient Greek ἀκροβατέω, akrobateo, “walk on tiptoe, strut”) is the performance of extraordinary human feats of balance, agility, and motor coordination. It can be found in many of the performing arts, sporting events, and martial arts. Acrobatics is most often associated with activities that make extensive use of gymnastic elements, such as acro dance, circus, and gymnastics, but many other athletic activities—such as ballet, slacklining and diving—may also employ acrobatics. Although acrobatics is most commonly associated with human body performance, it may also apply to other types of performance, such as aerobatics…

Acrobatic traditions are found in many cultures, and there is evidence that the earliest such traditions occurred thousands of years ago. For example, Minoan art from c. 2000 BC contains depictions of acrobatic feats on the backs of bulls. Ancient Greeks practiced acrobatics, and the noble court displays of the European Middle Ages would often include acrobatic performances that included juggling.

In China, acrobatics have been a part of the culture since the Tang Dynasty (203 BC). Acrobatics were part of village harvest festivals. During the Tang Dynasty, acrobatics saw much the same sort of development as European acrobatics saw during the Middle Ages, with court displays during the 7th through 10th century dominating the practice. Acrobatics continues to be an important part of modern Chinese variety art.

Though the term initially applied to tightrope walking, in the 19th century, a form of performance art including circus acts began to use the term as well. In the late 19th century, tumbling and other acrobatic and gymnastic activities became competitive sport in Europe…

An aerialist is an acrobat who performs in the air, on a suspended apparatus such as a trapeze, rope, cloud swing, aerial cradle, aerial pole, aerial silk, or aerial hoop…

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